Jom Welcome the new Mis-Communication minister in the Madani administration

The new Mis-Communication minister, Fahmi Fadzil is the other minister besides the Federal Territories Minister, Zaliha Mustafa, who should tender his resignation, and failing that, should be sacked.

If you recall, Zaliha, as the rakyat’s representative of the Pardon’s Board, failed to make known the rakyat’s needs which is NOT to grant the convicted felon, Najib Abdul Razak, a full pardon. We also did NOT want the board to commute or shorten Najib’s sentence. We do not agree to both.

What have Malaysians gained from Fahmi’s tenure as the Communications Minister? Websites were blocked and requests have been made to social media sites, to delete tweets or posts. Why is the Minister for Communication curbing free speech?

Below are excerpts from today’s Malaysiakini report and it is about the new Mis-Communication minister, Fahmi Fadzil.

Fahmi, who is also the government’s spokesman, said that the cabinet meeting on 7 February, did not discuss whether there was a need for the Pardons Board to make public its grounds for reducing former prime minister Najib Abdul Razak’s jail term

Fahmi (whom we have relegated to be the new Mis-Communications minister), told reporters that the content of the board’s discussions is confidential and there was no precedent where the board needed to announce its deliberations.

Didn’t the Madani administration promise to be more transparent than previous administrations? Oh well, we have been fooled yet again.

Fahmi said, “As far as I know, the cabinet did not discuss whether there is a need for the Pardons Board to make such an announcement.

“And the board usually does not give comments or statements. As far as I remember, this was never done before.”

Does he know that there is a first time for everything? The country was livid when Najib was granted the partial pardon. THey demand answers. There is a two tiered system of justice. People are unhappy.

Fahmi said this to the question of the government’s position regarding calls for the Pardons Board to reveal the justifications behind its decision to reduce the punishment against Najib in the SRC International corruption case.

The board had halved Najib’s 12-year prison term and reduced his fine from RM210 million to RM50 million.

When asked for his personal view as a minister, Fahmi cited the opinion of constitutional expert Shad Saleem Faruqi who recently wrote an opinion on the matter.

“In this matter, I (agree with) the opinion of Shad, who two days ago wrote his opinion in The Star newspaper.

“In the article, he said the deliberations in the Pardons Board are secret. I can accept that view,” Fahmi said.

Well Minister. When discussions which affect the country and the rakyat remain secret, how do we know whether the major players are doing the right thing or are up to no good?

Najib’s case of bein granted a partial pardon is a public interest story. He is a high profile convict. He no ordinary conman and crook. His crime affected all of Malaysia, both locally and overseas

How do we know our interests are being protected?

For far too long, for at least four decades. ministers have used draconian laws to stop us, the rakyat, from speaking out.

Politicians fear criticism or fear their wrongdoing is exposed so they hide behind these draconian laws to silence us. They also hide behind the petticoats of the royals.

We are warned that we cannot say this, cannot say that….haram lah, sedition lah, tak patriotic lah…semua sahaja ada block…..

So they impose ridiculous conditions, so we cannot criticise harsh laws, must terima sahaja, or we are forced to say nothing about the injustice, the corruption, the abuse of power, the bull that is thrown our way…

TETAPI….jangan lupa….we do have a choice….and that ability to choose comes at every general election.

So, Fahmi, why don’t you work on your shortcomings instead of wanting to block sites, or take members of the rakyat to court, who dare speak out.

NB: The original link to this news article is here.

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